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Book Going Solo by Roald Dahl (2012-02-02)

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Going Solo by Roald Dahl (2012-02-02)

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    Available in PDF - DJVU Format | Going Solo by Roald Dahl (2012-02-02).pdf | Language: UNKNOWN
    Roald Dahl(Author)

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Book details

  • PDF | Unknown pages
  • Roald Dahl(Author)
  • Penguin (1767)
  • Unknown
  • 5
  • Other books

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Review Text

  • By Bernie Gourley on May 16, 2017

    This is the first of a two-volume autobiography of the writer of children’s books, Roald Dahl. You probably know of Dahl from his fictional works such as: “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory,” “Matilda,” “The BFG,” “The Twits,” or “Fantastic Mr. Fox.”I initially picked up the second part, “Going Solo,” which is about Dahl’s adult life--particularly his early post-school years in which he was an expat serving with Shell Corporation in Africa and—when the war broke out—a fighter pilot. I figured I should read the first part first because it’s short, readable, and might have bearing on his later life. I’m glad that I did, but not because it’s necessary to make sense of “Going Solo.” Rather, because this volume provides great insight into Dahl’s body of work.Dahl was Norwegian, but spent his school years in Britain, attending boys’ schools and a boarding school. The English schools provided much inspiration for Dahl’s villains and fueled his adversarial view of the child-adult interaction—a view that serves writers of children’s literature well. While I suspect the teachers and administers were just strict and reserved as one might expect at a prestigious school in Britain, it’s easy to see how this lack of affection becomes villainy in the mind of a child. (Not to mention the upperclassmen, who too easily become like the kapos from Nazi concentration camps.)One feels this child’s perspective throughout the book. The book is written for an audience of children, not so much in the language [which is approachable for young readers] as in the attitude. Dahl presents the world from a kid’s-eye view. He also makes occasional notes to emphasize to children the ways in which the world was changed. Travel and communication for today’s youth are completely different enterprises than they were in the interwar years.Besides seeing how the teachers, administrators, and upperclassman provided Dahl with villains for books like “Matilda,” one also learns about the origins of “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory.” Dahl and his classmates were given sampler boxes of prototype chocolates from Cadbury in exchange for a product review. This started Dahl thinking about laboratories and research facilities inside a chocolate factory, and a book and movie enterprise was born.Quentin Blake, illustrator for most of Dahl’s books, provides numerous illustrations in the style of the other books. However, there are also many photos and notes from Dahl’s personal archives. The back of the edition that I have has a number of short ancillary features that are oriented toward kids.I’d recommend this for anyone who is interested in Dahl’s life specifically, but also for anyone who’s interested in writing for children. I think writers can learn a lot from how Dahl presents his childhood in this book.

  • By Love at First Book on September 16, 2012

    I've always been a big Roald Dahl fan, both of his books and the books that have been turned into movies. I loved "James and the Giant Peach," "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory," and "Matilda" just to name a few.I had been meaning to read "Boy" and "Going Solo," Dahl's two memoirs, and started them the other day. I was unbelievably surprised to find out that Roald Dahl's birthday was September 13th (and he would have been 96 years old)! I mean, what kind of coincidence is that?Anyway, I decided to talk about both books in one post because they are very much related. "Boy" is the story of Dahl's childhood, and follows his life up to age 20. "Boy" is filled with humorous stories that have inspired many of his books.For instance, we learn that Dahl attended boarding schools under mean headmasters, and an even nastier matron, who bears a striking resemblance to the Trunchbull from "Matilda."Dahl spent his early elementary days, aged 7-9, obsessed with a neighborhood candy shop and the Gobstoppers inside it (inspiration for Willy Wonka?), and even had his hand (ah, I made a pun that will only be recognizable if you read the book!) in a prank on the candy shopkeeper that he calls the Great Mouse Plot of 1924.Dahl was also lucky enough to go to a boarding school that Cadbury would send samples to in order to find out what kind of chocolates young boys enjoyed!"Boy" is a fabulous read, with many stories that can easily be linked to some of his most popular novels.I highly recommend reading "Boy" is you want a humorous look at the youth of one of the most famous and well-loved children's authors."Going Solo," on the other hand, would be better for those people who wanted to know more about Dahl's military life, which contained fewer references and story lines related to the books we grew up with."Going Solo" was about Roald Dahl's experiences in the military, with exploits about flying planes and secret missions. While I liked the book, I did get bored with the military aspect towards the end. If you like Roald Dahl and enjoy reading about the military, you might enjoy "Going Solo." Otherwise, stick with "Boy," which is a read that I think many more people would enjoy.What is your all time favorite Roald Dahl story?Thanks for reading,Rebecca from LoveAtFirstBook blog


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